Planifique su voto SA

Que hay en la boleta

This May there are two different elections. On May 7th, voters will go head to the polls to vote on State constitutional amendments, municipal bonds, and local propositions and on May 24th, voters will have the opportunity to participate in runoff elections from the March Primary.

Visita nuestro página de votación para saber cómo votar el día de las elecciones o antes. Revise los enlaces a continuación para descubrir qué hay en la boleta local y por qué es importante cada puesto.

May 7th Ballot

State Constitutional Amendments

State of Texas Proposition 1

Senate Joint Resolution 

Proposing a constitutional amendment authorizing the legislature to provide for the reduction of the amount of a limitation on the total amount of ad valorem taxes that may be imposed for general elementary and secondary public school purposes on the residence homestead of a person who is elderly or disabled to reflect any statutory reduction from the preceding tax year in the maximum compressed rate of the maintenance and operations taxes imposed for those purposes on the homestead. 

Full Text

Be it resolved by the Legislature of the State of Texas: 

SECTION 1. Section 1-b, Article VIII, Texas Constitution, is amended by adding Subsection (d-2) to read as follows:

(d-2) Notwithstanding Subsections (d) and (d-1) of this section, the legislature by general law may provide for the reduction of the amount of a limitation provided by Subsection (d) of this section and applicable to a residence homestead for a tax year to reflect any statutory reduction from the preceding tax year in the maximum compressed rate, as defined by general law, or a successor rate of the maintenance and operations taxes imposed for general elementary and secondary public school purposes on the homestead. A general law enacted under this subsection may take into account the difference between the tier one maintenance and operations rate for the 2018 tax year and the maximum compressed rate for the 2019 tax year applicable to a residence homestead and any reductions in subsequent tax years before the tax year in which the general law takes effect in the maximum compressed rate applicable to a residence homestead.

SECTION 2. This proposed constitutional amendment shall be submitted to the voters at an election to be held May 7, 2022. The ballot shall be printed to permit voting for or against the proposition: “The constitutional amendment authorizing the legislature to provide for the reduction of the amount of a limitation on the total amount of ad valorem taxes that may be imposed for general elementary and secondary public school purposes on the residence homestead of a person who is elderly or disabled to reflect any statutory reduction from the preceding tax year in the maximum compressed rate of the maintenance and operations taxes imposed for those purposes on the homestead.”

State of Texas Proposition 2

S.J.R. No. 2 

Senate Joint Resolution 

Proposing a constitutional amendment increasing the amount of the residence homestead exemption from ad valorem taxation for public school purposes.

Full Text:

Be it resolved by the Legislature of the State of Texas: 

SECTION 1. Section 1-b(c), Article VIII, Texas Constitution, is amended to read as follows:

(c) The amount of $40,000 [$25,000] of the market value of the residence homestead of a married or unmarried adult, including one living alone, is exempt from ad valorem taxation for general elementary and secondary public school purposes. The legislature by general law may provide that all or part of the exemption does not apply to a district or political subdivision that imposes ad valorem taxes for public education purposes but is not the principal school district providing general elementary and secondary public education throughout its territory. In addition to this exemption, the legislature by general law may exempt an amount not to exceed $10,000 of the market value of the residence homestead of a person who is disabled as defined in Subsection (b) of this section and of a person 65 years of age or older from ad valorem taxation for general elementary and secondary public school purposes. The legislature by general law may base the amount of and condition eligibility for the additional exemption authorized by this subsection for disabled persons and for persons 65 years of age or older on economic need. An eligible disabled person who is 65 years of age or older may not receive both exemptions from a school district but may choose either. An eligible person is entitled to receive both the exemption required by this subsection for all residence homesteads and any exemption adopted pursuant to Subsection (b) of this section, but the legislature shall provide by general law whether an eligible disabled or elderly person may receive both the additional exemption for the elderly and disabled authorized by this subsection and any exemption for the elderly or disabled adopted pursuant to Subsection (b) of this section. Where ad valorem tax has previously been pledged for the payment of debt, the taxing officers of a school district may continue to levy and collect the tax against the value of homesteads exempted under this subsection until the debt is discharged if the cessation of the levy would impair the obligation of the contract by which the debt was created. The legislature shall provide for formulas to protect school districts against all or part of the revenue loss incurred by the implementation of this subsection, Subsection (d) of this section, and Section 1-d-1 of this article. The legislature by general law may define residence homestead for purposes of this section. 

SECTION 2. The following temporary provision is added to the Texas Constitution:

TEMPORARY PROVISION. (a) This temporary provision applies to the constitutional amendment proposed by the 87th Legislature, 3rd Called Session, 2021, increasing the amount of the residence homestead exemption from ad valorem taxation for public school purposes.

(b) The amendment to Section 1-b(c), Article VIII, of this constitution takes effect January 1, 2022, and applies only to a tax year beginning on or after that date.

(c) This temporary provision expires January 1, 2023.

SECTION 3. This proposed constitutional amendment shall be submitted to the voters at an election to be held May 7, 2022. The ballot shall be printed to permit voting for or against the proposition: “The constitutional amendment increasing the amount of the residence homestead exemption from ad valorem taxation for public school purposes from $25,000 to $40,000.” 


City of San Antonio Bond Propositions

City of San Antonio Proposition A

STREETS, BRIDGES & SIDEWALKS

This proposition authorizes the City of San Antonio to issue bonds for the purposes of making permanent public improvements for public purposes providing streets, bridges, bicycle, multi-modal and sidewalk improvements as well as related incidental improvements including utility relocation, street lighting, driveway approaches, upgrading technology and traffic signals and improving signage. This proposition will also include acquiring necessary lands and rights-of-way, acquiring and installing, landscaping and acquiring and installing public art related to the proposition.

A “yes” vote supports authorizing the city of San Antonio to issue $471,557,000 in bonds to fund projects on streets, bridges, and sidewalks.

A “no” vote opposes authorizing the city of San Antonio to issue $471,557,000 in bonds to fund projects on streets, bridges, and sidewalks.

Read the complete project breakdown for Proposition A

City of San Antonio Proposition B

DRAINAGE AND FLOOD CONTROL

This proposition authorizes the City of San Antonio to issue bonds for the purpose of making permanent public improvements for public purposes, specifically: providing drainage and flood water improvements and facilities to improve or develop storm drainage systems to include detention basins, channels, elimination of low water crossings and other enhancements including as applicable sustainable green infrastructure. This proposition will also provide the acquisition of lands and rights-of-way necessary for such purposes and the acquiring and installation of public art related to the proposition.

A “yes” vote supports authorizing the city of San Antonio to issue $169,873,000 in bonds to fund flood control and drainage projects.

A “no” vote opposes authorizing the city of San Antonio to issue $169,873,000 in bonds to fund flood control and drainage projects.

Read the complete project breakdown for Proposition B

City of San Antonio Proposition C

PARKS AND RECREATION

This proposition authorizes the City of San Antonio to issue bonds for the purpose of making permanent public improvements for public purposes, specifically: acquiring, constructing, equipping, renovating, and landscaping for park, recreation and open space improvements and additions including public facilities located in and integral to such parks, acquiring necessary lands and rights-of- way, and the acquiring and installation of public art related to the proposition.

A “yes” vote supports authorizing the city of San Antonio to issue $271,915,000 in bonds to fund parks and recreations projects.

A “no” vote opposes authorizing the city of San Antonio to issue $271,915,000 in bonds to fund parks and recreations and drainage projects.

Read the complete project breakdown for Proposition C

City of San Antonio Proposition D

LIBRARY & CULTURAL FACILITIES

This proposition authorizes the City of San Antonio to issue bonds for the purpose of making permanent public improvements for public purposes, specifically: rehabilitating, upgrading, improving, renovating, equipping, and landscaping library and other cultural facilities to benefit or promote cultural and social enrichment, acquiring necessary lands and rights-of-way, and the acquiring and installation of public art related to the proposition.

A “yes” vote supports authorizing the city of San Antonio to issue $58,375,000 in bonds to fund libraries and cultural facilities.

A “no” vote opposes authorizing the city of San Antonio to issue $58,375,000 in bonds to fund libraries and cultural facilities.

Read the complete project breakdown for Proposition D

City of San Antonio Proposition E

PUBLIC SAFETY FACILITIES

This proposition authorizes the City of San Antonio to issue bonds for the purpose of making permanent public improvements for public purposes, specifically: acquiring, constructing, improving, renovating, upgrading, equipping, and landscaping public safety facilities to include fire, police, emergency medical services, animal control facilities, and other facilities to protect the health, safety and welfare of the residents of the City, acquiring necessary lands and rights-of-way, as well as the acquiring and installation of public art related to the proposition.

A “yes” vote supports authorizing the city of San Antonio to issue  $78,280,000 in bonds to fund projects on public safety facilities.

A “no” vote opposes authorizing the city of San Antonio to issue  $78,280,000 in bonds to fund projects on public safety facilities.

Read the complete project breakdown for Proposition E

City of San Antonio Proposition F

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

The utilization of $150 million of the 2022 Bond Program is for the production and preservation of affordable and permanent supportive housing. Funding will be used for the acquisition, construction, preservation and rehabilitation of homes, providing loans and grants for affordable housing programs as may be permitted by law, and the acquisition of land and interests in land and property necessary to do so; and the levying of a tax sufficient to pay for the bonds and noteS.

A “yes” vote supports authorizing the city of San Antonio to issue  $150,000,000 in bonds to fund projects on affordable housing.

A “no” vote opposes authorizing the city of San Antonio to issue  $150,000,000 in bonds to fund projects on affordable housing.

Read the complete project breakdown for Proposition F


North East ISD School Board Elections

North East ISD trustees serve four-year terms, and elections are held during even numbered years. The North East ISD will hold an Election on Saturday, May 7, 2022.  Trustee Positions 2, 3, and 7 will be on the ballot to serve a four-year term.  

District 2

Candidates

Terri Williams (i)
Jacqueline Klein
Rhonda Rowland

Mapa

District 3
District 7

Candidates

Marsha Landry
Joseph Trevino
Sandy Winkley (i)

Mapa


Alamo Heights ISD School Board Elections

Place 1

Candidates:

David Hornburger (i)
Katherine Kingman Gainey

Place 2

Candidates:

Brian Hamilton(i)
Elise Kibler
Jane Lindell Hughes


Southwest ISD School Board Elections

At-Large Seat

Incumbent Ida Sudolcan, incumbent Sylvester Vasquez Jr.Raul Leonidas NuquesStefanie Salinas are running in the general election for Southwest Independent School District school board. In this race, voters will select two candidates.

Candidates

Ida Sudolcan (i)
Sylvester Vasquez Jr (i)
Raul Leonidas Nurques
Stefanie Salinas


May 24th Ballot

Joint Primary Runoff Elections

Scroll below to learn more about each of the positions up for grabs on May 24th. More information on each candidate will be provided as we get closer to election day

Republican Primary

US House of Representatives

As per the Constitution, the U.S. House of Representatives makes and passes federal laws. The House is one of Congress’s two chambers (the other is the U.S. Senate), and part of the federal government’s legislative branch. The number of voting representatives in the House is fixed by law at no more than 435, proportionally representing the population of the 50 states. To learn more about the job duties associated with the house of representatives, haga clic aquí.

United States Representative: District 28

In the first round of the 2022 Republican Primary, Cassey Garcia and Sandra Whitten advanced to the runoff after coming in first and second our of field of seven candidates. Learn more about each candidate, below.

Cassey Garcia

Sandra Whitten

Map of House District 28 based on the most recent US Census Data. To learn more about the cities, counties, and school districts that reside in District 28, visit the Texas Tribune.

United States Representative: District 35

In the first round of the 2022 Republican Primary, Dan McQueen and Michael Rodriguez to the runoff after coming in first and second out of a field of ten candidates. Learn more about each candidate, below.

Dan McQueen

Michael Rodriguez

Map of the 35th House district based on the most recent census data.

State-Wide Races

Attorney General

What are the functions of the Attorney General?

The Attorney General is the lawyer for the State of Texas and is charged by the Texas Constitution to:

  • defend the laws and the Constitution of the State of Texas
  • represent the State in litigation
  • approve public bond issues

To fulfill these responsibilities, the Office of the Attorney General serves as legal counsel to all boards and agencies of state government, issues legal opinions when requested by the Governor, heads of state agencies and other officials and agencies as provided by Texas statutes, sits as an ex-officio member of state committees and commissions, and defends challenges to state laws and suits against both state agencies and individual employees of the State. Learn More

Candidates:

Ken Paxton

George P. Bush

Commissioner of the General Land Office

What are the functions of the Land Commissioner?

The oldest state agency in Texas, the GLO was formed to determine who owned what and where after the Texians and Tejanos won independence. Today the General Land Office manages state lands, operates the Alamo, helps Texans recovering from natural disasters, helps fund Texas public education through the Permanent School Fund, provides benefits to Texas Veterans, and manages the vast Texas coast.

Candidates:

Tim Westley

Dawn Buckingham

Comisionado de Ferrocarriles

What are the functions of the Texas Railroad Commission?

The Railroad Commission of Texas was established in 1891 under a constitutional and legislative mandate to prevent discrimination in railroad charges and establish reasonable tariffs. It is the oldest regulatory agency in the state and one of the oldest of its kind in the nation. The Railroad Commission of Texas no longer has any jurisdiction or authority over railroads in Texas, a duty which was transferred to other agencies, with the last of the rail functions transferred to the Texas Department of Transportation in 2005.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (Commission) is the state agency with primary regulatory jurisdiction over the oil and natural gas industry, pipeline transporters, natural gas and hazardous liquid pipeline industry, natural gas utilities, the LP-gas industry, and coal and uranium surface mining operations. The Commission exists under provisions of the Texas Constitution and exercises its statutory responsibilities under state and federal laws for regulation and enforcement of the state’s energy industries. The Commission also has regulatory and enforcement responsibilities under federal law including the Surface Coal Mining Control and Reclamation Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, Pipeline Safety Acts, Resource Conservation Recovery Act, and Clean Water Act.

Candidates:

Sarah Stogner

Wayne Christian

State Representative- District 122

What are the functions of the Texas State House?

The Texas House of Representatives is composed of 150 members, each elected for a two-year term. A member of the house must be a citizen of the United States, must be a qualified elector of the state, and must be at least 21 years old. He or she must have been a resident of the state for two years immediately preceding election, and for one year immediately preceding election must have been a resident of the district from which he or she was chosen.

The house of representatives elects one of its own members as presiding officer–the speaker of the house. The house creates and enforces its own rules and judges the qualifications of its members.

The house of representatives, together with the state senate, constitute the Texas Legislature. The duties of the legislature include consideration of proposed laws and resolutions, consideration of proposed constitutional amendments for submission to the voters, and appropriation of all funds for the operation of state government. All bills for raising revenue considered by the legislature must originate in the house of representatives. The house alone can bring impeachment charges against a statewide officer, which charges must be tried by the senate.

Candidates:

Mark Dorazio

Elisa Chan


County-Wide Races

Justice of the Peace, Precinct 3, Place 1

The justice of the peace presides over the justice court in cases involving misdemeanors, small civil disputes, landlord/tenant disputes and more. They also conduct inquests and may perform marriage ceremonies.

A justice of the peace in Texas has the following duties:

  • Hears traffic and other Class C misdemeanor cases punishable by fine only
  • Hears civil cases with up to $20,000 in controversy
  • Hears landlord and tenant disputes
  • Hears truancy cases
  • Performs magistrate duties
  • Conducts inquests

For more complete information about the responsibilities of a justice of the peace and other county officials, see the “Guide to Texas Laws for County Officials.”

Candidates:

Julie Bray Patterson

Joseph P Applet

Republican County Chair

What does the County Chair do?

The County Chair is the leader of the local party in each county throughout the state. Some of their responsibilities include overseeing the Primary, Candidate Filing, and other elections; chairing County Executive Committee Meetings; organizing and leading the local party; as well as overseeing and/or assisting with precinct and county or Senate District Conventions as required.

Candidates:

Jeffery McManus

John Austin

Precinct Chairs

Precinct Chairs Duties

  • Help promote and grow the local county party
  • Work to elect Republican candidates to office
  • Maximize the Republican vote in each precinct

Precinct Chair, No. 1080

  • Ian Matthew Hernandez
  • Thomas Koch

Precinct Chair, No. 2053

  • Sheron Mercer Barnes
  • Chris Noel Carlin

Precinct Chair, No. 2054

  • Betty M. Eckert
  • Holly Chamness

Precinct Chair, No. 2066

  • Gary Mansch
  • Christopher Pugh

Precinct Chair, No. 2077

  • Deborah Winfrey
  • Kellye D. Taylor

Precinct Chair, No. 2082

  • Kathy Scoggin Swallow
  • Louis Kreusel

Precinct Chair, No. 2083

  • Diana G. Hernandez
  • James Meyrat

Precinct Chair, No. 2120

  • William Badders
  • Joy L. Anderson

Precinct Chair, No. 2126

  • Jessica Conde-Blum
  • Barbara Miller

Precinct Chair, No. 3013

  • Jordan White
  • Esther Solis Fasci
  • Sunshine Andersland

Precinct Chair, No. 3022

  • Sandra Jean Crocker
  • Jimmie Balling

Precinct Chair, No. 3039

  • Jessica Conde-Blum
  • Barbara Miller

Precinct Chair, No. 3055

  • Reed Greene
  • Robert Bruce

Precinct Chair, No. 3058

  • Paula Moore
  • Mark Griffin

Precinct Chair, No. 3060

  • Shelly C. Grunden
  • Clay Arden Moore

Precinct Chair, No. 3065

  • Alvin Amerson
  • William J. Librera

Precinct Chair, No. 3066

  • Paul Pearson
  • Robert Stovall
  • Gloria Schaefer

Precinct Chair, No. 3072

  • Charlie Hamberg
  • Rebecca Engle

Precinct Chair, No. 3075

  • Alvin Amerson
  • William J. Librera

Precinct Chair, No. 3078

  • Paul Pearson
  • Robert Stovall
  • Gloria Schaefer

Precinct Chair, No. 3083

  • Charlie Hamberg
  • Rebecca Engle

Precinct Chair, No. 3084

  • William Peche
  • Jonathan Melendez

Precinct Chair, No. 3093

  • Lee Salinas
  • Miguel Martinez

Precinct Chair, No. 3102

  • Liza Chism
  • Allen Hamilton

Precinct Chair, No. 3114

  • Curt Tempel
  • Doug Dooley

Precinct Chair, No. 3151

  • David Winney
  • Leornard Peterson

Precinct Chair, No. 3157

  • Robert Cantu
  • Christopher Miller

Precinct Chair, No. 3165

  • Kimi-Lyn Reed
  • Donovan Maycock

Precinct Chair, No. 3194

  • Fernando Comarillo
  • Mary Snell

Precinct Chair, No. 4050

  • Mike Hoffman
  • Lamar Lawson

Precinct Chair, No. 4106

  • Kathleen Ellen Ball
  • Cheryl Hagenson

Precinct Chair, No. 4157

  • Justin Nichols
  • Jack Finger


Democratic Primary

State-Wide Races

Attorney General

What are the functions of the Attorney General?

The Attorney General is the lawyer for the State of Texas and is charged by the Texas Constitution to:

  • defend the laws and the Constitution of the State of Texas
  • represent the State in litigation
  • approve public bond issues

To fulfill these responsibilities, the Office of the Attorney General serves as legal counsel to all boards and agencies of state government, issues legal opinions when requested by the Governor, heads of state agencies and other officials and agencies as provided by Texas statutes, sits as an ex-officio member of state committees and commissions, and defends challenges to state laws and suits against both state agencies and individual employees of the State. Learn More

Candidates

Rochelle Garza

Joe Jaworski

Lieutenant Governor

The Texas lieutenant governor has more than eighty (80) statutory duties, including administering oaths, and creating emergency interim succession. The lieutenant governor also statutorily serves as a member or joint chair of or appoints members to more than 70 boards and commissions. For a complete list of duties, haga clic aquí.

Candidates:

Michelle Beckley

Mike Collier

Commissioner of the General Land Office

What are the functions of the Land Commissioner?

The oldest state agency in Texas, the GLO was formed to determine who owned what and where after the Texians and Tejanos won independence. Today the General Land Office manages state lands, operates the Alamo, helps Texans recovering from natural disasters, helps fund Texas public education through the Permanent School Fund, provides benefits to Texas Veterans, and manages the vast Texas coast.

Candidates:

Jay Kleberg

Sandragrace Martinez

Comptroller

The Comptroller’s office serves virtually every citizen in the state. As Texas’ chief tax collector, accountant, revenue estimator, treasurer and purchasing manager, the agency is responsible for writing the checks and keeping the books for the multi-billion-dollar business of state government.

As chief financial officer, the Comptroller’s office collects taxes and fees owed the state. Most of the office’s duties and powers are enumerated in the Texas Tax Code and in Chapter 403 of the Texas Government Code. As guardian of the state’s fiscal affairs, agencies depend on the Comptroller’s office to pay their bills and issue paychecks to state employees. Legislators rely on the Comptroller’s office to chart the course of the Texas economy, produce annual financial reports and estimate future state revenues. Local officials and businesses look to the agency for economic development guidance and data analysis. Taxpayers rely upon it for assistance and guidance regarding compliance with tax laws. And all Texas residents depend on the Comptroller’s office to safeguard their tax dollars and ensure they are handled wisely.

As the state’s cashier, the Comptroller’s office receives, disburses, counts, safeguards, records, allocates, manages and reports on the state’s cash. In addition, the Texas Comptroller chairs the state’s Treasury Safekeeping Trust, which invests, manages and oversees more than $50 billion in assets.

The Comptroller’s office is also the state’s purchasing manager, awarding and managing hundreds of statewide contracts on behalf of more than 200 state agencies and 1,600 cooperative purchasing members. The agency is committed to cultivating a healthy economic environment in Texas by providing a variety of services to business owners, taxpayers, local officials, HUBs and everyday Texans.

The Comptroller’s office also administers a variety of programs, including the State Energy Conservation Office, Texas college savings plans, statewide procurement initiatives, and more.

Candidates

Janet T. Dudding

Angel Luis Vega

es_MXSpanish